When Seeing Double Is a Good Thing!

with 3 Comments

Every once in a while a tip comes along that really makes me do the happy dance! Well, get out your dancing shoes, because this is one of those tips. It will not only save you time, and prevent your scrolling finger from cramping up, it will also save wear and tear on the old eyeballs… especially if you do a lot of photo editing, like I do.

We've all been there. You're zoomed in close on a photo, working away on a small area of the image, and you constantly have to zoom in and out, or scroll in and out, to check your work. Zoom in and do a little cloning… zoom out and see how it's looking on the overall image. Well… no more! The solution is so simple, and it's perfect for retouching photos, restoring old photos, or any photo editing project that requires close work. Here we go…

Tutorial:This complete Digi Scrap Tutorial is available to our Digital Scrapper Plus and Premier Members. If you're a member, please take a moment to log in, then just come back here and refresh this page. Not a Plus Member? It's free! Find out more information here.[/am4guest] 


For Adobe Photoshop Version click here.

Step 1; Zoom In on the Area of Your Image that Needs Work

Maybe you're doing some close-up cloning, or working on some selective color in a tiny space. But pretty soon, you find yourself wanting to “step back” to see how things are shaping up. That's where the next step comes in.

Step 2: In the Menu Bar choose Window > Images > New Window

A new floating window will pop up with your original image… not a copy, but a sort of “reflection” of the same image you're working on. Just drag it to the side of the zoomed-in image you're working on.

Step 3: Go Back to Your Editing

And, as you work, you'll see the results of your cloning or other edits appear on the image in the new window. You'll be able to “watch yourself work” and see the progress you're making, without having to zoom in and out of the original image you're working on. Any changes you make on your image are reflected on the full size image.

When you're done, just close one of the windows and save your project the way you normally do. Are you dancing yet? Enjoy the tip… and the time you'll save!

Download a PDF version of this “When Seeing Double Is a Good Thing” tutorial.

Windows: Right click on the link and choose “Save Target As” or a similar command. Mac: Click on the link to download the file.

Step 1: Zoom In on the Area of Your Image that Needs Work

Maybe you're doing some close-up cloning, or working on some selective color in a tiny space. But pretty soon, you find yourself wanting to “step back” to see how things are shaping up. That's where the next step comes in.

Step 2: In the Menu Bar choose Window > Arrange > New Window for (name of your photo)

A new floating window will pop up with your original image… not a copy, but a sort of “reflection” of the same image you're working on. Just drag it to the side of the zoomed-in image you're working on.

Step 3: Go Back to Your Editing

And, as you work, you'll see the results of your cloning or other edits appear on the image in the new window. You'll be able to “watch yourself work” and see the progress you're making, without having to zoom in and out of the original image you're working on. Any changes you make on your image are reflected on the full size image.

When you're done, just close one of the windows and save your project the way you normally do.

Are you dancing yet?

Enjoy the tip… and the time you'll save!

Download a PDF version of this “When Seeing Double Is a Good Thing” tutorial.

Windows: Right click on the link and choose “Save Target As” or a similar command. Mac: Click on the link to download the file.

3 Responses

  1. Nannette Dalton
    |

    Wow I never saw this tip before… and yes I am dancing!!!

  2. Carolyn Degroot
    |

    bummer – I could not get it to work – yes – it did open a copy but put it in the project bin.
    Did I miss a step?

    HELP

  3. mary omalley
    |

    That is so clever!! Thanks for sharing:-)